Kentucky man charged with smuggling MINORS into the U.S. to make child porn

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Kentucky man charged with smuggling MINORS into the U.S. to make child porn  illegal

An alleged human trafficker has been arrested in Kentucky for smuggling three illegal immigrants – two of them minors – into the United States to help him produce child pornography.

According to the federal indictment from the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, Natividad Aguilera Garcia, 37, of Shelby County, started tricking one of the minors, identified as “Minor A,” to be engaged in prohibited sexual activities on May 1, 2021. Garcia has been producing and receiving sexually explicit visuals of Minor A and, at the same time, transporting the victim across state or international borders to engage in illegal sexual activities for years.

The indictment also stated that Garcia assisted in the illegal entry of three individuals, including Minor A, into the United States.

After the successful illegal entry of Minor A, Garcia presented a fake birth certificate to the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), falsely claiming that he was the uncle of Minor A. Unfortunately, the ORR accepted the falsified documents and handed Minor A to Garcia without conducting a formal vetting process. (Related: Immigrant children being organ harvested in massive global organ trade racket that’s beginning to be exposed.)

However, during an undercover investigation by the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, the Kentucky State Police Electronic Crime Branch arrested Garcia. The state police then began its own investigation after they discovered Garcia uploading images of child sexual exploitation online.

Garcia now faces between 15 to 30 years in prison for the charge of production of child pornography alone. He also faces charges of receipt of child pornography, enticement of a juvenile for sex, transportation of a juvenile for sex, encouraging illegal entry, making a false statement to the government and presenting a false document to the government.

Garcia case sparks renewed debate over border policies and child safety

Garcia’s case has reignited debates over poor immigration and border policies and how these have negatively affected children both in and outside the United States.

Jessica Vaughan, a prominent voice from the Center for Immigration Studies, argued that the case has left many unanswered questions about the victims, including how Garcia connected with his victims and whether parents were involved.

“This case could have been prevented through better policies: better vetting of this sponsor, follow-up once a child is placed in the custody of someone who is not their parents,” said Vaughan.

Under federal law, unaccompanied alien children [UAC] from distant lands who arrive at the border must be directly turned over into the custody of the [HHS] until the department identifies a potential sponsor.

During the administration of former President Donald Trump, the vetting process for potential sponsors took 102 days. However, when President Joe Biden took office, the ORR only took 35 days to release children to the foster placement system. And now, it just stands at 31 days. In turn, the process has only created horrifying experiences for UAC.

A scathing HHS report released in February found that 16 percent of ORR child case files in March and April 2021 lacked documentation of sponsor background checks. Moreover, in 19 percent of cases where children were released to sponsors pending Federal Bureau of Investigation or state checks, the case files were never updated with results.

Watch this GB News report about how the United Kingdom’s “imported violence” – courtesy of African migrants – is a threat to public safety.

This video is from the CONSERVATIVE POLITICS & NWO channel on Brighteon.com.