German Police Raid Homes of Dozens of Men Accused of Hurting Feelings Online

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German Police Raid Homes of Dozens of Men Accused of Hurting Feelings Online  germany

German law enforcement authorities raided the homes of 45 men accused of using “misogynist” language and hurting women’s feelings on the internet.

The raids were part of a “combating misogyny on the internet” day of action, which comes one day before International’s Women’s Day, and were carried out in a coordinated effort by Germany’s Central Office for Combating Cybercrime in Frankfurt, the Federal Criminal Police Office, and several state law enforcement agencies, according to the Associated Press.

“We are observing how online platforms are increasingly becoming the scene of hate, harassment and discrimination, also targeting especially women,” declared Holger Muench, the head of Germany’s Federal Criminal Police Office.

In Germany, using slurs online against women and minorities including immigrants and transgender people can be criminally punishable as incitement to “hatred.”

The crackdown on so-called online “hate crimes” in Germany follows moves by other WEF-infiltrated governments to criminalize name calling.

In Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seeking the power to imprison citizens whom the government suspect “might” commit a “hate crime” in the future.

The Daily Telegraph reports that the policy will form part of the Trudeau’s dystopian ‘Online Harms Bill,’ which cracks down on any opposition to the regime’s far-left authoritarian agenda.

One of the measures within the bill would grant the power to place individuals under house arrest and force them to wear an electronic tag if the state believes that individual might commit a hate crime in the future.

The country’s Justice Minister, Arif Virani, claimed the legal right to lock people who have not committed a crime will play a “very important” role in preventing criticism of minorities.

“What’s really critical is that it gives the judge a wonderful range of sentences,” he continued. “This is not a mandatory minimum of a life sentence, this is just a larger range, including what would be the maximum sentence.”

Under the measures proposed in Bill C-63, which was first unveiled last month, those found guilty of such crimes could face life sentences in prison.