New Disease Emerges That Only Infects Fully Covid Vaxxed

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New Disease Emerges That Only Infects Fully Covid Vaxxed

A new disease has emerged that only seems to infect people who are “fully vaccinated” for Covid.

The new autoinflammatory ailment was first discovered in 2021 after the Covid mRNA injections were rolled out for public use.

People who were injected with COVID-19 shots are now increasingly being diagnosed with this new type of disease that scientists are calling VEXAS syndrome.

VEXAS syndrome, short for vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory, somatic syndrome, is said to be caused by mutations in the innate immune cells, as well as a somatic mutation in the UBA1 gene found on the X chromosome. Most inflammatory diseases, by the way, are caused by dysfunction that arises in adaptive immune cells.

“Somatic mutations cannot be inherited, meaning individuals acquire this mutation later in life,” explains The Epoch Times about the disease.

“The mutation affects the stem cells in the bone marrow.

“The cells mature into specialized immune cells that circulate within the bloodstream.”

“Immune cells carrying the UBA1 mutation are highly inflammatory, and once enough of them accumulate, patients start developing symptoms.”

Back in April, French scientists reported on the case of a 76-year-old man who almost immediately after getting jabbed for COVID with Pfizer’s mRNA (modRNA) variety was diagnosed with VEXAS syndrome.

His symptoms included tender bumps under the skin, rashes, and purple spots on his limbs.

Skin problems are commonly reported among VEXAS patients, and the man was no exception.

He was later determined by specialists to have the UBA1 mutation inherent to the disease.

“The rare incidence of VEXAS syndrome and the short delay of 3 days between vaccination and onset of symptoms were very suggestive of the vaccine’s role as a trigger,” the study authors, from Drôme Nord Hospitals, wrote.

Another patient, 72, developed similar symptoms, as well as a fever, fatigue, a cough, and deep vein thrombosis.

He was initially misdiagnosed with “long COVID,” only to later also show evidence of the same UBA1 mutation as the first patient.

“In my experience, it is unlikely that VEXAS syndrome could have been triggered by an infection or COVID-19 vaccination,” commented Dr. Sinisa Savic, an immunologist and associate clinical professor at the University of Leeds.

“We know that as people age, they develop all sorts of mutations in the bone marrow …

“That is why VEXAS is largely found in the elderly* population.”

Typically, VEXAS syndrome occurs in men over the age of 50.

Both infections and vaccinations can trigger or worsen symptoms in people who are already on track to develop VEXAS syndrome.

“Anything that triggers an immune response can cause temporary worsening symptoms,” Dr. Savic added.

“I don’t think there’s any particular argument about that.”

Among specialized immune cells, only innate immune cells have been found to carry the UBA1 mutation.

Adaptive immune cells, meanwhile, form what is known as the “third” or last line of defense against disease, and these cells have not been found to carry the UBA1 mutation.

Dr. Savic believes that adaptive immune cells, including T and B cells, probably cannot survive long enough to become specialized if they carry the UBA1 mutation.

Specialization of innate immune cells, conversely, appears to be less affected by the UBA1 mutation.

Both infections and vaccinations trigger responses in the immune system that are supposed to (in theory for vaccinations, anyway) form immune memory.

This process does not occur in people with autoinflammatory conditions – in fact, an immune reaction can cause an imbalance that actually worsens a patient’s condition.

“This is the case with any autoimmune or inflammatory condition because the immune system tries to control itself, but if you’re then challenged by something else, then that level of control may be reduced,” Dr. Savic said.