Leaked Audio Tape Emerges of Hillary Clinton Proposing to Rig Palestine Election

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Leaked Audio Tape Emerges of Hillary Clinton Proposing to Rig Palestine Election

A leaked audio recording of Hillary Clinton has revealed that the former Secretary of State wanted to rig a foreign election.

On September 5, 2006, Eli Chomsky, an editor and staff writer for the Jewish Press, interviewed Hillary Clinton for a shoo-in re-election as a U.S. senator.

The tape was never released and has only been heard by a small handful of Jewish Press staffers in the room. Chomsky recalls being taken aback that anyone could support the idea that the U.S. should be in the business of fixing foreign elections.

Clinton appeared to make a questionable moral equivalency when discussing elections in areas controlled by the Palestinian Authority.

She weighed in about the January 25, 2006, election for the second Palestinian Legislative Council (the legislature of the Palestinian National Authority), which was a resounding victory for Hamas (74 seats) over the U.S.-preferred Fatah (45 seats).

Regarding capturing combatants in war, Clinton can be heard on the tape saying, “And then, when, you know, they sent the terrorists, you know, they came across the Gaza border via an underground tunnel, they killed and captured, kidnapped the young Israeli soldier, you know, there’s a sense of like, one-upmanship, and in these cultures of, you know, well, if they captured a soldier, we’ve got to capture a soldier.”

The use of the phrase “these cultures” is also a bit of a head-scratcher. According to Chomsky, Clinton was “gracious, personable and pleasant throughout” the interview, taking about an hour to speak to, in addition to himself, managing editor Jerry Greenwald, assistant to the publisher Naomi Klass Mauer, counsel Dennis Rapps, and senior editor Jason Maoz.

Another part of the tape highlights something that was relatively uncontroversial at the time but has taken on new meaning in light of the current campaign—speaking to leaders with whom our country is not on the best terms.

According to Chomsky, Clinton was “gracious, personable and pleasant throughout” the interview, taking about an hour to speak to, in addition to himself, managing editor Jerry Greenwald, assistant to the publisher Naomi Klass Mauer, counsel Dennis Rapps and senior editor Jason Maoz.

Chomsky is heard on the tape asking Clinton what now seems like a prescient question about Syria, given the disaster unfolding there and its looming threat to drag the U.S., Iran, and Russia into confrontation.

“Do you think it’s worth talking to Syria—both from the U.S. point [of view] and Israel’s point [of view]?”

Clinton replied, “You know, I’m pretty much of the mind that I don’t see what it hurts to talk to people.

“As long as you’re not stupid and giving things away. I mean, we talked to the Soviet Union for 40 years.

“They invaded Hungary, they invaded Czechoslovakia, they persecuted the Jews, they invaded Afghanistan, they destabilized governments, they put missiles 90 miles from our shores, we never stopped talking to them.”

Clinton has presented a very tough front in discussing Russia, accusing Trump of unseemly ardor for strongman Vladimir Putin and mocking his oft-stated prediction that as president he would “get along” with Putin.

Chomsky is heard on the tape asking Clinton what now seems like a prescient question about Syria, given the disaster unfolding there and its looming threat to drag the U.S., Iran, and Russia into confrontation.

She replied, “You know, I’m pretty much of the mind that I don’t see what it hurts to talk to people. As long as you’re not stupid and giving things away. I mean, we talked to the Soviet Union for 40 years.

They invaded Hungary, they invaded Czechoslovakia, they persecuted the Jews, they invaded Afghanistan, they destabilized governments, they put missiles 90 miles from our shores, they never stopped talking to them,” an answer that reflects her mastery of the facts but also reflects a willingness to talk to Russia that sounds more like Trump 2016 than Clinton 2016.

A final bit of interest to the current campaign involves an articulation of phrases that Trump has accused Clinton of being reluctant to use.

Discussing the need for a response to terrorism, Clinton said, “I think you can make the case that whether you call it ‘Islamic terrorism’ or ‘Islamo-fascism,’ whatever the label is we’re going to give to this phenomenon, it’s a threat. It’s a global threat and it needs a global response.”