House Intel Committee Issues ‘Vague Warning’ About Serious Threat to National Security

321
House Intel Committee Issues ‘Vague Warning’ About Serious Threat to National Security

The chair of the House Intelligence Committee issued a cryptic warning on Wednesday about a “serious national security threat” involving Russia and space, Politico has reported.

While the D.C. insiders provided few details, one of them stated that the intelligence is related to Russia’s weaponization of its orbiting systems.

“A vague warning by the chair of the House Intelligence Committee about a ‘serious national security threat’ Wednesday is related to Russia and space, according to three people familiar with the matter,” Politico’s Pentagon reporter Lara Seligman shared on X.Rep. Mike Turner (R-Ohio) stated in a statement Wednesday morning that his committee had released material regarding the national security threat and urged the administration to declassify the intelligence so that officials and lawmakers may consult with allies.

It’s unclear why Turner issued the statement now, given that the intelligence has been available to House intelligence committee leaders and their top aides in a secure room on Capitol Hill for more than a week, according to one of the sources.

Politico noted that House intelligence committee members opened the sensitive reports to viewing by both House and Senate members.

“It’s possible Turner was attempting to raise alarms about Russia’s advancements in space as a way of underscoring the need for lawmakers to approve additional aid to Ukraine,” the report conceded. “The Senate passed the supplemental bill including $60 billion in aid for Kyiv. It is currently under review by the House.”

There was harsh scrutiny of the “national security threat” on social media.

“Very interested to learn about this threat,” remarked Senator Mike Lee. “Also very interested to know why the spy guys are raising mysterious alarms right before we’re about to reform illegal domestic surveillance under FISA.”

“The national security threat is coming from inside the building,” quipped journalist Julie Kelly.

Twenty-two Republican senators voted for the Ukraine aid package, while 26 Republicans opposed.

‘The final vote was 70-29 with 22 Republicans voting yes. McConnell, Thune, Boozman, Capito, Cassidy, Collins, Cornyn, Cramer, Crapo, Ernst, Grassley, Hoeven, Kennedy, Moran, Murkowski, Risch, Romney, Rounds, Sullivan, Tillis, Wicker and Young,” Greg Price on Tuesday noted on X.

House and Senate members in favor of passing the Ukraine provisions of the foreign aid package have been undertaking a full court press on social media platforms like X to persuade the public of its necessity.

“Gentle note to House Republicans,” Rep. Hakeem Jeffries implored. “You work for the American people, not Vladimir Putin. Pass the damn bipartisan national security bill.”

However, there has been ample pushback from political observers outside of D.C. questioning how the Ukraine aid package advances the United States’ compromised national security.

“Gentle note for all House members,” Harrison Krank replied. “You work for the American people, not Ukraine, Putin, Israel, or Taiwan Spend our tax dollars at home or dont [sic] tax us.”

Speaker Mike Johnson has already spoken out on the unlikely passage of the Senate’s Ukraine aid bill.

“The Republican-led House will not be jammed or forced into passing a foreign aid bill that was opposed by most Senate Republicans,” Johnson remarked.

Several lawmakers, including Johnson, said there was no reason to be alarmed.

“I want to assure the American people there is no need for public alarm,” Johnson said at the Capitol. “We are going to work together to address this matter, as we do all sensitive matters that are classified and beyond that, I’m not at liberty to disclose classified information and really can’t say much more, but we just want to assure everyone steady hands are at the wheel, we’re working on it, and there’s no need for alarm.”

“People should not panic — that is unequivocal. People should not panic,” said Rep. Jim Himes (D-CT) who is the ranking member on the House Intelligence Committee.